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NATIONAL METHAMPHETAMINE TRAINING & TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE CENTER
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Latest news: 02-13-09

Grocery discount card tracked couple's purchases of meth materials

Your shopping list could land you in jail. Once you sign up for those discount store cards, you’re being tracked -- with a single swipe it delivers great savings and info to police in one recent instance.

A couple in Lower Saucon Township may have thought they were being super savers, but Giant Food Stores flagged numerous purchases of products that could be used to make methamphetamine. Data collected by bonus cards helped lead to the arrests of Kim Ann Hammel, 40, and David Conrad, 41.

Full story, MSNBC


Couple catches meth lab while fishing

A couple fishing in Lonoke County Thursday thought they'd discovered a duffle bag full of money. It turned out to be a mobile meth lab.

The Lonoke County Sheriff's Office says the couple was fishing at a bayou located near North Walters Chapel Road in Lonoke, when one of the two hooked the bag and brought it to the bank. Investigators say the bag contained chemicals, glassware, components, and paraphernalia used to manufacture methamphetamine.

Lt. Jim Kulesa says, “We will process some of the items for latent prints to identify and attempt to locate the owner. It appears that the bag had been stashed near the bank, and with the recent rain, it drifted off into the water."

From KARK-TV


While awaiting prison for meth, woman caught making it

A National Institute on Drug Abuse report refers to methamphetamine as a “potent and highly addictive psychostimulant.” A recent meth bust in Warren County might illustrate that statement.

Deputies patrolling in the Wright City area on Feb. 4 noticed a plume of black smoke rising skyward that led them to Rodeo Drive. While there, they noticed a chemical odor.

Sheriff Kevin Harrison said detectives Scott Schoenfeld and Jeff Doerr found a burn pile in the yard of Valerie J. Murphy, 33, of the 11400 block of Rodeo Drive. Next to the burn pile were items police commonly associate with making or using meth — Coleman fuel cans, pieces of aluminum foil, and, most telling, a modified air tank with a discolored valve assembly. The tank smelled of anhydrous ammonia.

Full story, St. Lois Post-Dispatch

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