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NATIONAL METHAMPHETAMINE TRAINING & TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE CENTER
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Latest news: 02-23-09

2 killed in meth lab house explosion

RAY CITY, Ga. - The state is assisting Lanier County authorities investigate the weekend deaths of two women who were killed after a suspected methamphetamine lab exploded inside a house in Ray City.

Georgia Insurance and Safety Fire Commissioner John Oxendine said the blast occurred early Friday in the south Georgia city.

Lanier County Coroner Patches Phillips identified the dead as 65-year-old Annie Ruth Power and 37-year-old Constance Bennett.


From Fox News


Support but no money for anti-meth plan

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. - Missouri officials say a lack of money has caused the state to put off its high-tech fight against methamphetamine.

Mike Boeger, interim administer of the Bureau of Narcotics and Dangerous Drugs, says it could take at least a year to start the electronic registry of meth ingredients once it's funded.

The State Highway Patrol says last year Missouri led the country with 1,487 meth lab incidences.

Since 2005, Missouri pharmacists have kept a paper record of purchases of cold medicines with pseudoephedrine, a main meth ingredient. The logs slowed the number of meth labs, but they are increasing again.

Connecting pharmacies through a single system will make it easier for a store to track purchases someone made elsewhere.

From KHQA-TV


Data shows motel, hotel rooms increasingly used as makeshift labs

CHATTANOOGA, Tenn. - Methamphetamine "cooks" are secretly converting hundreds of motel and hotel rooms into covert drug labs — leaving behind a toxic mess for unsuspecting customers and housekeeping crews.

They are places where drug-makers can go unnoticed, mixing the chemicals needed for the highly addictive stimulant in a matter of hours before slipping out the next morning. The dangerous contaminants can lurk on countertops, carpets and bathtubs, and chemical odors that might be a warning clue to those who follow can be masked by tobacco smoke and other scents.

Full story, The Associated Press

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